Closing the Digital Gap: How to Get Every Student Access, Everywhere, Anytime

Location: Room 217BC

Listen and learn

[Listen and learn : Panel]

Wednesday, June 28, 9:00–10:00 am
Location: Room 217BC

Dr. Aleigha Henderson-Rosser   Beatrice Hogan   Jerri Kemble   Dewayne McClary   Adam Phyall  
Digital equity is the most critical issue facing public education. And while it seems everyone is talking about it, not everyone has ideas on how to tackle it. This panel of innovative experts will do just that, sharing best practices from their districts.

Skill level: Intermediate
Attendee devices: Devices not needed
Focus: Leadership
Topic: Digital equity
Grade level: PK-12
ISTE Standards: Administrators : Visionary leadership
Administrators : Digital age learning culture
Students : Empowered learner
Additional detail: Session recorded for video-on-demand

Proposal summary

Purpose & objective

Digital equity is the most critical issue facing public education. And while it seems everyone is talking about it, not everyone has ideas on how to tackle it. This panel of innovative experts will do just that, sharing best practices from their districts. The ISTE Student Standards can not be met by all students unless we first address the issue of digital equity. In order for students to become digital citizens, knowledge constructors, innovative designers, computational thinkers, creative and global communicators, they must engage with modern technology and have access to the internet beyond the school day.

Moderating the discussion will be Kevin Hogan, Editor of Tech and Learning, a magazine that has been working to assist educators in addressing the digital equity issue by hosting a three part series on digital equity (April, May, June 2016), hosting a digital equity summit in September (http://www.techlearning.com/blogentry/11230)  and hosting a webinar for educational technology leaders on the digital equity topic.  The panel will comprise of leaders serving school districts in varies sizes and demographics. The panelists are:
Aleigha Henderson-Rosser, Executive Director, Instructional Technology, Atlanta Public Schools;Jerri Kemble, Assistant Superintendent of Innovation and Technology, Lawrence Public Schools; Dewayne McClary,Director, Educational Technology District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS); Adam Phyall, Director of Technology & Media Services, Newton County School System, Covington, GA; and Kevin Hogan, Content Director of Tech & Learning Magazine.

The conversation will include the following subtopics:
The Complexity of the digital equity issue
Digital equity and closing the homework gap
Digital leadership – access is just one step
Ramifications of bringing Wi-Fi to all students
How the lack of home Wi-Fi impedes teaching and learning in the classroom
The intricacies and complexity of collecting digital equity data
Drilling down in the data by demographic
Debunking easy solutions to this problem by exposing faulty presuppositions about digital equity.
Why solving the problem through mobile devices perpetuates inequity
Closing the digital gap: the effect on entire communities/families
Creative ways to gain traction on this civil rights issue
Multi-pronged approaches to closing the digital equity gap
( Everyoneon.org, Kajeet hotspots, business partners, working with community, extending school hours)
Sustainability

Outline

This panel discussion will be moderated by Kevin Hogan. The four educational leaders will briefly discuss their background in digital equity work, their successes and the hurdles they have experienced as they work to bring access to all students.
Following their short background (3-4 minutes each), the panel will discuss the following subtopics:
The Complexity of the digital equity issue
Digital equity and closing the homework gap
Digital leadership – access is just one step
Ramifications of bringing Wi-Fi to all students
How the lack of home Wi-Fi impedes teaching and learning in the classroom
The intricacies and complexity of collecting digital equity data
Drilling down in the data by demographic
Debunking easy solutions to this problem by exposing faulty presuppositions about digital equity.
Why solving the problem through mobile devices perpetuates inequity
Closing the digital gap: the effect on entire communities/families
Creative ways to gain traction on this civil rights issue
Multi-pronged approaches to closing the digital equity gap
( Everyoneon.org, Kajeet hotspots, business partners, working with community, extending school hours)
Sustainability

A back channel will be available to allow for audience participation and questions.

Supporting research

Project Tomorrow Speak Up Survey
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) 2015.
Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) 2014.
The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation: Teachers Know Best Report.
Project Tomorrow Making Learning Mobile 3.0 report 2016

Federal Reserve
http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/ifdp/2008/958/ifdp958.pdf

Make Learning Mobile 3.0 Report
http://www.kajeet.net/hubfs/MLM3-Report.pdf?t=1458156927302

Horrigan, J. B. (2015, April 20). The numbers behind the broadband
'homework gap' Retrieved August 09, 2016, from
http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/04/20/the-numbers-behind-the-broadband-homework-gap/

Pew Research Center
http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/04/20/the-numbers-behind-the-broadband-homework-gap/ Pew Research Center
http://www.pewresearch.org/daily-number/teachers-see-digital-divide-among-students/

More...

Presenters

Dr. Aleigha Henderson-Rosser, Atlanta Public Schools

Beatrice Hogan

Jerri Kemble, Lawrence Public Schools

Dewayne McClary, District of Columbia Public Schools

Adam Phyall, Newton County School System

Mr. Adam Phyall is a former high school science teacher and the current Director of Technology & Media Services for Newton County Schools. Since Adam got his first laptop in college, he has been hooked on the amazing things that technology can add to instruction. Over the years, Mr. Phyall has been a keynote speaker and featured presenter at technology conferences across the country He is known for his fun and engaging presentation style and his humor. His philosophy on teaching is “if you’re having fun teaching it, then your students will have fun learning it.”


Technology-charged
learning starts here

San Antonio

June 25-28, 2017

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