ISTE 2019No Fear
Coding Lab
Creative
Constructor Lab
Digital
Leadership Summit

Friends Don't Let Friends Use Word Art - Teaching Creation Literacy

Location: W193a

Explore and create
Pre-registration required

Explore and create : BYOD


Monday, June 25, 12:00–1:00 pm
Location: W193a

Tanya Avrith  
Our students need to understand the importance of being able to create work that others will want to consume. In this session, we will look at how design plays a crucial role in any product. We will highlight the importance of design and pedagogical principles that help us create.

Skill level: Beginner
Attendee devices: Devices required
Attendee device specification: Smartphone: Windows, Android, iOS
Laptop: Chromebook, Mac, PC
Tablet: Android, iOS, Windows
Participant accounts, software and other materials: Google Slides, Flipgrid, Socrative, Padlet
Focus: Digital age teaching & learning
Topic: Creativity and productivity tools
Grade level: PK-12
ISTE Standards: For Students:
Creative Communicator
  • Students create original works or responsibly repurpose or remix digital resources into new creations.
  • Students choose the appropriate platforms and tools for meeting the desired objectives of their creation or communication.
  • Students publish or present content that customizes the message and medium for their intended audiences.

Proposal summary

Purpose & objective

Participants will be able to distinguish the difference between effective and ineffective aesthetic design principles, why teaching creation literacy is important and how to teach students how to be critical creators.

Participants will be able to:

- Distinguish the difference between effective and ineffective design principles.
- Examine basic design principles that include: the difference between noise and signal.
- Basic design principles - (1. using visuals, 2. use of white space, 3. having visual breathing room, 4. using a grid to design images or slides).
Finally - we will look at practical tools such as Canva, Pixlr, Unsplash, Creative Commons, Google Slides (add on's for Slides) and noun project and have participants use these design tools to apply their newly acquired skills to design a collaborative crowdsourced Google Slide deck of their biggest takeaways from the conference.

Outline

(10 minutes) Introduction to the importance of creation literacy - overview of why teaching students design principles are important.

(20 minutes) Participants engage in a fun game entitled "hot or not" where they provide feedback on different designs deemed "hot or not" In this game, they categorize the difference between effective and ineffective aesthetic design principles, why teaching creation literacy is important and how to teach students how to be critical creators.

Participants will be able to:

- Distinguish the difference between effective and ineffective design principles.
- Examine basic design principles that include: the difference between noise and signal.
- Basic design principles - (1. using visuals, 2. use of white space, 3. having visual breathing room, 4. using a grid to design images or slides).

(15 minutes)
Finally - we will look at practical tools such as Canva, Pixlr, Unsplash, Creative Commons, Google Slides (add on's for Slides) and noun project and have participants use these design tools to apply their newly acquired skills (10 minutes) to design a collaborative crowdsourced Google Slide deck of their biggest takeaways from the conference.

Crowdsourcing out network (10 minutes) participants will leave with quality resource created with Google slides and based on the ideas and takeaways from the conference from other participants using applied skills from the workshop.

Supporting research

Duarte, N. (2008). Slide:ology: The art and science of creating great presentations. Beijing ; Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly Media.

Duarte, N. (2010). Resonate: Present Visual Stories that Transform Audiences. Beijing ; Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly Media.

Gardner, H., & Davis, K. (n.d.). The app generation: How today's youth navigate identity, intimacy, and imagination in a digital world.
Innovative Students in a Digital World. (n.d.). Retrieved September 22, 2014, from http://dcp.lbpsb.qc.ca/

Ritchhart, R., Church, M., & Morrison, K. (2011). Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Wagner, T., & Compton, R. A. (2012). Creating innovators: The making of young people who will change the world. New York: Scribner.

Weinberger, D. (2011). Too big to know: Rethinking knowledge now that the facts aren't the facts, experts are everywhere, and the smartest person in the room is the room. New York: Basic Books.

Zhao, Y. (2012). World class learners: Educating creative and entrepreneurial students. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, a Joint Publication with the National Association of Elementary School Principals.

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Presenters

Tanya Avrith, tanyaavrith.com

Tanya Avrith M.A. EdTech is a passionate educator and author of “The Google Infused Classroom”; from Montreal Canada, now living in South Florida. She is a Google Certified Innovator and Apple Distinguished Educator. With deep roots as a teacher and pedagogue, Tanya consults with schools to help plan and execute large-scale deployments and professional development plans for digital citizenship, technology integration initiative and organizational development in schools. Tanya is currently the Personal Branding and Digital Communication Teacher at North Broward Preparatory School in Coconut Creek, Florida.

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