ISTE20Creative
Constructor Lab
Digital
Leadership Summit
Edtech Advocacy &
Policy Summit

What K-12 Principals Really Think About Educational Technology

Location: W187a

Listen and learn

Listen and learn : Panel


Monday, June 25, 4:00–5:00 pm
Location: W187a

Kevin Bushweller   Henry Hall   Josh McMahon   Lindsy Stumpenhorst  
Education Week’s Technology Counts team will present insights about an exclusive, nationally representative survey it conducted that examined what K-12 principals think about personalized learning, the amount of time students spend in front of computer screens, teenagers’ social media behavior, and the computer science for all movement. The survey presentation will set the stage for a panel discussion with three principals about these issues.

Skill level: Beginner
Attendee devices: Devices not needed
Participant accounts, software and other materials: Technology Counts 2018: What Do Principals Believe?
https://www.edweek.org/ew/collections/technology-counts-2018/index.html
Focus: Digital age teaching & learning
Topic: Personalized learning
Grade level: PK-12
Subject area: Not applicable, Computer science

Proposal summary

Purpose & objective

The goal is to help these audiences better understand the attitudes and beliefs principals have about educational technology, how their perspectives influence their work with teachers on ed-tech initiatives, the tensions their beliefs create with district-level administrators such as superintendents and chief technology officers, and how their attitudes about educational technology are likely to evolve in the years ahead.

Outline

Session will start with a 15-20 minute PowerPoint presentation showing the results of a nationally representative survey of K-12 principals' views on four key technology topics: screen time, personalized learning, social media, and computer science education.

Presentation will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by Education Week Assistant Managing Editor Kevin Bushweller with three school principals about the challenges they face around those four ed-tech topics.

Session will end with a 10-minute Q&A period with the audience.

Supporting research

Technology Counts 2018: What Do Principals Believe?
https://www.edweek.org/ew/collections/technology-counts-2018/index.html

More [+]

Presenters

Kevin Bushweller, Education Week

Kevin Bushweller, the executive editor of EdWeek Market Brief, is also an assistant managing editor for Education Week who oversees coverage of educational technology and the K-12 marketplace. He manages the Digital Directions channel and serves as project editor of Technology Counts, Education Week's annual report about the state of ed tech. Kevin began working at Education Week in 2000, and has been covering education for newspapers and magazines for more than 25 years. Earlier in his career, he was a senior editor for American School Board Journal and Electronic School magazines.

Henry Hall, Richardson Independent School District

Henry Hall has been an administrator for 17 years after teaching, and is currently the Principal of Berkner High School & STEM Academy, a 1:1 high school in Richardson ISD. Prior to Berkner, he was the Principal of Richardson West Junior High Arts & Technology Magnet for 8 years. At Richardson West Junior High he developed and started the 1:1 student to computer program that became the model for all secondary schools in Richardson ISD as it moved to a 1:1 program districtwide. He is a Richardson Independent School District Principal of the Year and Administrative Excellence Award Recipient.

Josh McMahon, Morton West High School
Lindsy Stumpenhorst, Washington Elementary School

Lindsy Stumpenhorst is a Principal at Washington Elementary School in Sterling, Illinois. Lindsy has written and presented for organizations including NAESP, NASSEP, ICE, IPA, and ILASCD. As a Principal, she expects students and teachers to work hard, but never alone. Most days you will find her learning alongside staff in between games of soccer or tetherball with students at recess. Lindsy doesn’t have an open door policy, she believes in an empty office policy.

People also viewed

Google Tools for Struggling Students
The Group Smackdown (If smacking was like a hug from a unicorn)
The Upside of Digital Media: Teaching Kids to be Screen Smart