ISTE20Creative
Constructor Lab
Digital
Leadership Summit
Edtech Advocacy &
Policy Summit

Creating Educational Breakout Games for FREE Using Google

Participate and share

Participate and share : Interactive lecture


Sunday, June 23, 10:00–11:00 am
Location: 113BC

v anderson   Stacey King  
Google provides a wealth of resources for educators that are free for both teachers and students. In this session, participants will learn how to utilize several Google tools - including Google Sites, Google Docs, Google Forms, and Google Slides - to create an instructional online escape room that won’t cost a penny.

Audience: Coaches, Curriculum/district specialists, Teachers
Skill level: Beginner
Attendee devices: Devices required
Attendee device specification: Smartphone: Windows, Android, iOS
Laptop: Chromebook, Mac, PC
Tablet: Android, iOS, Windows
Participant accounts, software and other materials: Any type of device will work for this session. If a mobile device is being used, it will be helpful to have the Google Docs and Google Slides apps downloaded.
Focus: Digital age teaching & learning
Topic: Game-based learning and gamification
Grade level: 6-12
ISTE Standards: For Educators:
Designer
  • Use technology to create, adapt and personalize learning experiences that foster independent learning and accommodate learner differences and needs.
  • Explore and apply instructional design principles to create innovative digital learning environments that engage and support learning.
Facilitator
  • Foster a culture where students take ownership of their learning goals and outcomes in both independent and group settings.

Proposal summary

Purpose & objective

Participants will participate in a couple different formats of breakout games to learn what they are and how to go about completing them.

Participants will know which Google Tools work best for different aspects of creating breakout games.

Participants will be able to create their own breakout game using Google Tools.

Outline

Introduction (5 minutes): Welcome, introduction of presenters, brief explanation of what a breakout game is.

Breakout Game 1 (20 minutes): Participants will break into groups and complete a breakout game that is completely online using a Google Site to house everything.

Breakout Game 2 (15 minutes): Participants will complete a second breakout game in their same groups that combines print-based materials as well as Google Tools.

Presentation (40 minutes): The presentation will include the process of creating a breakout game from brainstorming and selecting a topic through creating/finding the necessary resources to putting the game together. An online worksheet (Google Doc) will be provided to participants to take notes on during the presentation as ideas pop into their heads. The presentation will contain engaging graphics, gifs, and video clips pertaining to the content to help keep participants engaged. The passion that the presenters have for this presentation will also shine through to maintain audience engagement.

Questions and Answers (10 minutes/remaining time): Participants will be encouraged to ask questions and/or make suggestions about things they learned in the presentation.

Supporting research

1. Rivera, M. (2016, August 3). Is Digital Game-Based Learning The Future Of Learning? Retrieved September 27, 2018, from https://elearningindustry.com/digital-game-based-learning-future

2. Game-Based Learning: New Education Methods Could Help Students in 2016. (2016, May 15). Retrieved September 27, 2018, from https://www.vistacollege.edu/blog/online-learning/game-based-learning-new-education-methods-could-help-students-in-2016/

3. DiCerbo, K. (2015, November 10). Current state of game-based assessment. Retrieved September 27, 2018, from https://www.pearsoned.com/current-state-of-game-based-assessment/

More [+]

Presenters

v anderson, Utah Online School
Stacey King, Utah Online School

People also viewed

Assessment for Mobile Natives - Meeting Students Where They Are
Developing a Project-Based Personalized Learning Framework
Digital Equity and the Innovation Inequity Paradox: Unintended Consequences and Future Planning