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Edtech Advocacy &
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Spain's Future is in Their Hands: Let's Help Out!

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Participate and share : Poster


Saturday, December 5, 9:30–10:30 am PST (Pacific Standard Time)

Bayard Nielsen  
In classrooms across Spain, English language and culture assistants (college graduates from select countries) are teaching the future of Spain having received less than 80 minutes of pedagogical training. Learn how a Google Innovator created 18 weeks of online teaching curriculum and over 650 English activities to better support them.

Audience: Teachers, Teacher education/higher ed faculty
Skill level: Beginner
Attendee devices: Devices useful
Attendee device specification: Smartphone: Windows, Android, iOS
Laptop: Chromebook, Mac, PC
Tablet: Android, iOS, Windows
Participant accounts, software and other materials: http:///www.auxiliaresdeconversacion.org
Topic: Teacher education
Grade level: PK-12
Subject area: ESL, World languages
ISTE Standards: For Coaches:
Professional Development and Program Evaluation
  • Design, develop and implement technology-rich professional learning programs that model principles of adult learning and promote digital age best practices in teaching, learning and assessment.
  • Conduct needs assessments to inform the content and delivery of technology-related professional learning programs that result in a positive impact on student learning.
  • Evaluate results of professional learning programs to determine the effectiveness on deepening teacher content knowledge, improving teacher pedagogical skills and/or increasing student learning.

Proposal summary

Purpose & objective

PURPOSE:
The purpose of this poster session is to explain each step of the design thinking process a Google Innovator followed when designing, developing and evaluating a free, 18 week technology-rich professional learning program available globally for new English as a Second Language (ESL), English as a Foreign Language (EFL) and English Language Learner (ELL) teachers, specifically those who were Culture and Language Assistants (i.e., auxiliares de conversación de inglés) through the Spanish Ministry of Education.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
Participants will be able to describe the five basic steps in the design thinking process.

Participants will be able to explain how empathizing with previous participants identified a lack of pedagogical training, teaching materials, and mentors.

Participants will be able to reiterate the problems identified were: training assistants in an economical, convenient, and captivating way; using assistants’ free time (especially during the summer) to prepare them; better supplying assistants with resources (adapted to what they need) that will help them be more effective in the classroom and beyond

Participants will be able to discuss, explore and provide feedback on the prototypes developed by the presenter to solve the identified problems in the auxiliar de conversación de inglés program.

Participants will be able to inspect, analyze, critique and discuss the results of, and subsequent changes made to, the professional learning program with the presenter.

Participants will be able to evaluate the usefulness of the presenter’s tools for their learners, and will be able to implement similar solutions using free templates and explanations provided.

Participants will also be able to understand the organization of and use all materials on presenter’s website.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
Auxiliares de conversación, or English Language and Culture Assistants, are native English-speaking college graduates (many are from the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and Australia) that spend a year in Spain supporting teachers in public primary and secondary schools through Spain’s Ministerio de Educación y Formación Profesional. In some schools, auxiliares are expected to take charge of classes and plan entire lessons, even though this is not in their job description.

According to a study we conducted in Fall 2018, auxiliares identified three main areas of improvement for the program. As a result, we focused on offering the following resources: training in pedagogical methods- especially classroom management; providing activities and lessons - including games, culture presentations and conversation topics; and being paired with an experienced mentor.

Some of the major technology interventions used include: a website created using SquareSpace (www.auxiliaresdeconversacion.org), a lesson and resource repository built with Awesome-Table (www.auxiliaresdeconversacion.org/activities), flipped and differentiated professional development created with Google Suite for Education tools and distributed using Google Classroom, several blogs created through SquareSpace, a Podcast created using GarageBand and hosted through SquareSpace, numerous social media accounts, and a Facebook page and Facebook group.

The lesson plans used in the overall professional development are composed of 6 units with 3 modules each:
Unit 1: An “Auxiliar” Mindset
(1) The auxiliares de conversación experience, (2) High expectations, (3) Auxiliares de conversación placement
Unit 2: Setting Up Your Classes (& Year) For Success
(1) Classroom management, (2) Building a community, (3) 100% participation
Unit 3: How To Be The Fun Teacher
(1) Boring activity supercharger, (2) Formative assessment (Checks for understanding), (3) Engagement
Unit 4: Don’t Always Be The “Sage On The Stage” - Try Being the “Guide On The Side”
(1) Student centered teaching, (2) Project based learning, (3) Zero prep activities (I need something NOW)
Unit 5: Hey, This Is Fun! What Else Can I Try?
(1) Culture, Culture, Culture, Global world, (2) Strategies for previewing, reviewing and reflecting; Collaboration, (3) Advanced teaching techniques; Digital Citizenship
Unit 6: Oh *$&%! What do I do now?
(1) Dealing with difficult people, (2) Mentoring & Other Help, (3) Google Hangout
*Bonus Unit: So you want to teach?*
(1) How to actually lesson plan, (2) How being a teacher is different than being an auxiliar

Evidence of success: Since the creation of the website less than six months ago, its is now officially recommended by Spain’s Ministry of Education and is listed as a recommended resource on the website of the Language and Culture Assistant program. To date, over 5300 people have used a resource from the site.

Outline

[Same as previous outline]

PURPOSE:
The purpose of this poster session is to explain each step of the design thinking process a Google Innovator followed when designing, developing and evaluating a free, 18 week technology-rich professional learning program available globally for new English as a Second Language (ESL), English as a Foreign Language (EFL) and English Language Learner (ELL) teachers, specifically those who were Culture and Language Assistants (i.e., auxiliares de conversación de inglés) through the Spanish Ministry of Education.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
Participants will be able to describe the five basic steps in the design thinking process.

Participants will be able to explain how empathizing with previous participants identified a lack of pedagogical training, teaching materials, and mentors.

Participants will be able to reiterate the problems identified were: training assistants in an economical, convenient, and captivating way; using assistants’ free time (especially during the summer) to prepare them; better supplying assistants with resources (adapted to what they need) that will help them be more effective in the classroom and beyond

Participants will be able to discuss, explore and provide feedback on the prototypes developed by the presenter to solve the identified problems in the auxiliar de conversación de inglés program.

Participants will be able to inspect, analyze, critique and discuss the results of, and subsequent changes made to, the professional learning program with the presenter.

Participants will be able to evaluate the usefulness of the presenter’s tools for their learners, and will be able to implement similar solutions using free templates and explanations provided.

Participants will also be able to understand the organization of and use all materials on presenter’s website.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
Auxiliares de conversación, or English Language and Culture Assistants, are native English-speaking college graduates (many are from the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and Australia) that spend a year in Spain supporting teachers in public primary and secondary schools through Spain’s Ministerio de Educación y Formación Profesional. In some schools, auxiliares are expected to take charge of classes and plan entire lessons, even though this is not in their job description.

According to a study we conducted in Fall 2018, auxiliares identified three main areas of improvement for the program. As a result, we focused on offering the following resources: training in pedagogical methods- especially classroom management; providing activities and lessons - including games, culture presentations and conversation topics; and being paired with an experienced mentor.

Some of the major technology interventions used include: a website created using SquareSpace (www.auxiliaresdeconversacion.org), a lesson and resource repository built with Awesome-Table (www.auxiliaresdeconversacion.org/activities), flipped and differentiated professional development created with Google Suite for Education tools and distributed using Google Classroom, several blogs created through SquareSpace, a Podcast created using GarageBand and hosted through SquareSpace, numerous social media accounts, and a Facebook page and Facebook group.

The lesson plans used in the overall professional development are composed of 6 units with 3 modules each:
Unit 1: An “Auxiliar” Mindset
(1) The auxiliares de conversación experience, (2) High expectations, (3) Auxiliares de conversación placement
Unit 2: Setting Up Your Classes (& Year) For Success
(1) Classroom management, (2) Building a community, (3) 100% participation
Unit 3: How To Be The Fun Teacher
(1) Boring activity supercharger, (2) Formative assessment (Checks for understanding), (3) Engagement
Unit 4: Don’t Always Be The “Sage On The Stage” - Try Being the “Guide On The Side”
(1) Student centered teaching, (2) Project based learning, (3) Zero prep activities (I need something NOW)
Unit 5: Hey, This Is Fun! What Else Can I Try?
(1) Culture, Culture, Culture, Global world, (2) Strategies for previewing, reviewing and reflecting; Collaboration, (3) Advanced teaching techniques; Digital Citizenship
Unit 6: Oh *$&%! What do I do now?
(1) Dealing with difficult people, (2) Mentoring & Other Help, (3) Google Hangout
*Bonus Unit: So you want to teach?*
(1) How to actually lesson plan, (2) How being a teacher is different than being an auxiliar

Evidence of success: Since the creation of the website less than six months ago, its is now officially recommended by Spain’s Ministry of Education and is listed as a recommended resource on the website of the Language and Culture Assistant program. To date, over 5300 people have used a resource from the site.

Supporting research

Importance of having native, cultural expert assistant-teachers in class
Duranti, A., & Goodwin, C. (Eds.). (1992). Rethinking context: Language as an interactive phenomenon (No. 11). Cambridge University Press.

Sadow, S. A., & Maxwell, M. A. (1983). The Foreign Teaching Assistant and the Culture of the American University Class.

Participants will be able to describe the five basic steps in the design thinking process.
Brown, T. (2008). Design thinking. Harvard business review, 86(6), 84.
Participants will be able to explain how empathizing with previous participants identified a lack of pedagogical training, teaching materials, and mentors.
McDonagh, D., & Thomas, J. (2010). Rethinking design thinking:
Empathy supporting innovation. Australasian Medical Journal, 3(8), 458-464.

Participants will be able to reiterate the problems identified were: training assistants in an economical, convenient, and captivating way; using assistants’ free time (especially during the summer) to prepare them; better supplying assistants with resources (adapted to what they need) that will help them be more effective in the classroom and beyond

McDonald, K., & Smith, C. M. (2013). The flipped classroom for professional development: part I. Benefits and strategies. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 44(10), 437-438.

Smith, C. M., & McDonald, K. (2013). The flipped classroom for professional development: Part II. Making podcasts and videos. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 44(11), 486-487.d

Ash, K. (2012). Educators evaluate flipped classrooms. Education Week, 32(2), s6-s8.

Hardin, B. L., & Koppenhaver, D. A. (2016). Flipped professional development: An innovation in response to teacher insights. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 60(1), 45-54.

Jacot, M. T., Noren, J., & Berge, Z. L. (2014). The flipped classroom in training and development: Fad or the future?. Performance Improvement, 53(9), 23-28.

Participants will be able to discuss, explore and provide feedback on the prototypes developed by the presenter to solve the identified problems in the auxiliar de conversación de inglés program.
Hillgren, P. A., Seravalli, A., & Emilson, A. (2011). Prototyping and infrastructuring in design for social innovation. CoDesign, 7(3-4), 169-183.

Participants will be able to inspect, analyze, critique and discuss the results of, and subsequent changes made to, the professional learning program with the presenter.
*This speaks to the importance of looking not only at student data, but also teacher self evaluation*
Spooren, P., Brockx, B., & Mortelmans, D. (2013). On the validity of student evaluation of teaching: The state of the art. Review of Educational Research, 83(4), 598-642.

Unit 1: An “Auxiliar” Mindset
(1) The auxiliares de conversación experience, (2) High expectations, (3) Auxiliares de conversación placement
Rubie‐Davies, C. M. (2006). Teacher expectations and student self‐perceptions: Exploring relationships. Psychology in the Schools, 43(5), 537-552.

McBer, H. (2001). Research into teacher effectiveness. Early Professional Development Of Teachers, 68(216), 1-69.

Unit 2: Setting Up Your Classes (& Year) For Success
(1) Classroom management, (2) Building a community, (3) 100% participation
Emmer, E. T. (1994). Classroom management for secondary teachers.

Allyn & Bacon, A Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc., 160 Gould Street, Needham Heights, MA 02194..

Evertson, C. M. (1994). Classroom management for elementary teachers. Allyn & Bacon, A Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc., 160 Gould Street, Needham Heights, MA 02194.

Termos, M. H. (2013). The Effects of the Classroom Performance System on Student Participation, Attendance, and Achievement. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 25(1), 66-78.

Unit 3: How To Be The Fun Teacher
(1) Boring activity supercharger, (2) Formative assessment (Checks for understanding), (3) Engagement
Torrance, H., & Pryor, J. (1998). Investigating formative assessment: Teaching, learning and assessment in the classroom. McGraw-Hill Education (UK).

Irons, A. (2007). Enhancing learning through formative assessment and feedback. Routledge.

Smith, K. A., Sheppard, S. D., Johnson, D. W., & Johnson, R. T. (2005). Pedagogies of engagement: Classroom‐based practices. Journal of engineering education, 94(1), 87-101.

Unit 4: Don’t Always Be The “Sage On The Stage” - Try Being the “Guide On The Side”
(1) Student centered teaching, (2) Project based learning, (3) Zero prep activities (I need something NOW)
Sandholtz, J. H. (1997). Teaching with technology: Creating student-centered classrooms. Teachers College Press, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1234 Amsterdam Ave., New York, NY 10027.

Blumenfeld, P. C., Soloway, E., Marx, R. W., Krajcik, J. S., Guzdial, M., & Palincsar, A. (1991). Motivating project-based learning: Sustaining the doing, supporting the learning. Educational psychologist, 26(3-4), 369-398.

Unit 5: Hey, This Is Fun! What Else Can I Try?
(1) Culture, Culture, Culture, Global world, (2) Strategies for previewing, reviewing and reflecting; Collaboration, (3) Advanced teaching techniques; Digital Citizenship
Thanasoulas, D. (2001). The importance of teaching culture in the foreign language classroom. Radical pedagogy, 3(3), 1-25.

Alqarni, F. (2015). Collaborative strategic reading to enhance learners' reading comprehension in English as a Foreign Language. Academic Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies, 4(1), 161.

Mertens, S., & d'Haenens, L. (2010). The digital divide among young people in Brussels: Social and cultural influences on ownership and use of digital technologies.

Porto, M. (2016). Ecological and intercultural citizenship in the primary English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom: an online project in Argentina. Cambridge Journal of Education, 46(4), 395-415.

Unit 6: Oh *$&%! What do I do now?
(1) Dealing with difficult people, (2) Mentoring & Other Help, (3) Google Hangout
Portner, H. (2008). Mentoring new teachers. Corwin Press.

De Leon, J., Wise, T. N., Balon, R., & Fava, G. A. (2018). Dealing with difficult medical colleagues. Psychotherapy and psychosomatics, 87(1), 5-11.

*Bonus Unit: So you want to teach?*
(1) How to actually lesson plan, (2) How being a teacher is different than being an auxiliar
Dove, M., & Honigsfeld, A. (2010). ESL coteaching and collaboration: Opportunities to develop teacher leadership and enhance student learning. TESOL journal, 1(1), 3-22.

Farrell, T. S., & Bennis, K. (2013). Reflecting on ESL teacher beliefs and classroom practices: A case study. RELC journal, 44(2), 163-176.

Harmer, J. (2007). The practice of English language teaching. Harlow: Pearson Longman.

More [+]

Presenters

Photo
Bayard Nielsen, Notre Dame San Jose

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