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Edtech Advocacy &
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From Individual and Siloed to Collective and Engaging: Collaborative Threaded Reading Annotations

Participate and share

Participate and share : Poster


Sunday, November 29, 11:00 am–12:00 pm PST (Pacific Standard Time)

Nicole Naditz  
Foster student literacy skills by making successful (and largely invisible) reading strategies visible to all learners with Edji. More than reading, this tool allows learners to collaborate using voice, text and emoji as they annotate the texts and images of your choice.

Audience: Teachers
Skill level: Beginner
Attendee devices: Devices required
Attendee device specification: Smartphone: Windows, Android, iOS
Laptop: Chromebook, Mac, PC
Tablet: Android, iOS, Windows
Topic: Instructional design & delivery
Grade level: 6-12
Subject area: ESL, World languages
ISTE Standards: For Educators:
Facilitator
  • Foster a culture where students take ownership of their learning goals and outcomes in both independent and group settings.
Learner
  • Set professional learning goals to explore and apply pedagogical approaches made possible by technology and reflect on their effectiveness.
For Students:
Digital Citizen
  • Students engage in positive, safe, legal and ethical behavior when using technology, including social interactions online or when using networked devices.

Proposal summary

Purpose & objective

Purpose:
The purpose of this session is to explore explore and use Edji in a way that fosters equitable communication, collaboration and achievement through research-based best practices for literacy development.
Objectives--Participants will be able to:
1. Explain the basic features of Edji
2. Describe at least one example of how Edji might be used with a text or image in their content area
3. Select which features of Edji to use/enable with different texts to best meet the diverse needs of their learners and to foster equity and literacy

Educational Challenge: In many classrooms, students see themselves as "good" or "bad" readers. Those who struggle to comprehend (and use) what they read often don't know why they are struggling: they see other students apparently having more success as they read and those who are struggling are frustrated because they read the same thing and "got nothing out of it." Similarly, because so much of reading is internal and unseen, teachers don't always know how to help their learners because they can't "see" how the students are interacting with the text.
Intervention: Edji makes student reading a visible activity: teachers and other students can see which words or phrases are catching the students' attention and learn why those words resonated with the learners by reading or listening to the annotations the students are adding to the text. Furthermore, the tool facilitates student-centered approaches to literacy by allowing learners to engage with each other through threaded annotations.The features of Edji include the option for learners to annotate a text or an image (selected by the teacher) with voice, text, or emoji annotations, heat maps of student annotations and threaded annotations between learners. Furthermore, teachers can add precise questions for learners to respond to in addition to their annotations. Teachers can use the questions feature to help struggling readers do what successful readers do naturally: make predictions, ask questions and make connections to other works they have read/viewed or to their life experiences. This is a powerful tool for English Learners and those learning a world language because in addition to text resources, images or pdfs of authentic materials can also be used as the “text” that learners will annotate. However, content-area reading occurs across all subject areas, so this session will also appeal to those teaching other subjects, such as ELA, science, and social science.

Models employed:
1. Engage prior knowledge and honor participants' expertise with opening conversations on equity and literacy
2. Hands-on experiences both as a learner using the tool and as a teacher creating activities in the tool's interface
3. Modeling by facilitator, supported by visuals
4. Partner and small group conversations

Lesson plans or instructional activities/strategies employed.

1. Getting to know the room: using Mentimeter to find out the subjects/grade levels of the teachers in the room
2. Opening conversations: What is the role of student voice in fostering equity? What are the research-based practices that build content and academic literacy?
3. Experience Edji as a learner round 1: participants will access an activity I have already created in Edji for them. They will be guided to try all three types of annotation (text, voice, emoji)
4. Experience Edji as a learner round 2: they will respond to each other after I turn on “heat vision” (which makes their annotations visible to each other).
5. Reflective debrief (conversation) focusing on highlights of the tool, challenges they anticipate, questions. This will be done using a strategy such as “stand and share” and/or “walk and talk” to provide reflection and debriefing with increased interaction and differentiation for participant needs so that we aren’t exclusively “sit and screen” which is prevalent at technology presentations.
6. Modeling of how to design a learning experience using Edji, supported by visuals and seeing the tool in action in real time
7. Work time to begin creating a rich, literacy-embedded activity in Edji for their own learners with support of their peers in the room and myself.
8. Closure: reflection on personal next steps

Evidence of Success:
1. Participants' annotations demonstrating that they engaged meaningfully with the model text through their annotations and responses to each others' annotations.
2. Participants create a learning experience for their learners using an appropriate authentic resource/primary source document that leverages research-based literacy strategies through effective use of the features of Edji.

Outline

1. Getting to know the room: using mentimeter to find out the subjects/grade levels of the teachers in the room: 5 minutes
2. Opening conversations: What is the role of student voice in fostering equity? (5 minutes) What are the research-based practices that build content and academic literacy? (5 minutes)
3. Experience Edji as a learner round 1: participants will access an activity I have already created in Edji for them. They will be guided to try all three types of annotation (text, voice, emoji)--15 minutes
4. Experience Edji as a learner round 2: they will respond to each other after I turn on “heat vision” (which makes their annotations visible to each other). -- 10 minutes
5. Reflective debrief (conversation): highlights of the tool, challenges they anticipate, questions --10 minutes
6. Modeling of how to design a learning experience using Edji, supported by visuals and seeing the tool in action in real time --15 minutes
7. Work time to begin creating an activity for their own learners with support of their peers in the room and myself. --20 minutes
8. Closure: reflection on this tool's potential with research-based literacy strategies; selection of personal next steps -- 5 minutes

Supporting research

Equity and student voice: https://create.piktochart.com/output/33872107-tech-talk-and-equity (I made the infographic; research citations at the bottom)
Literacy: Super Seven Comprehension Strategies (book); Comprehension Connections (book) also multiple works by Fischer and Frey.

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Presenters

Photo
Nicole Naditz, San Juan Unified School District

Nicole Naditz, NBCT, M.Ed is Program Specialist, Instructional Technology and World Languages for SJUSD and previously taught French to grades 3-12. She has presented at local, state and national conferences since 1999 and is an invited keynote speaker and facilitator of professional learning at school districts. Nicole has won numerous honors and most recently, she was named the 2015 National Language Teacher of the Year by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. She is a Google Certified Innovator, Google Certified Trainer and an Apple Learning Academy Specialist.

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