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Edtech Advocacy &
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Whose Land App: Let's Talk About Indigenous Territory Recognition and Land Acknowledgement

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Participate and share : Poster


Thursday, December 3, 12:00–1:00 pm PST (Pacific Standard Time)

Michael Furdyk  
Explore the free Whose Land app that uses GIS technology to identify 650+ Indigenous Nations, territories, and Indigenous communities across Canada, United States and Australia. Included videos and learning materials foster better understanding about why land acknowledgements are important, and how Indigenous people view their relationship to the land.

Audience: Teachers, Technology coordinators/facilitators, Library media specialists
Skill level: Beginner
Attendee devices: Devices useful
Attendee device specification: Smartphone: Windows, Android, iOS
Laptop: Chromebook, Mac, PC
Tablet: Android, iOS, Windows
Participant accounts, software and other materials: Participants may download the iOS or Android App onto mobile devices ahead of time and could also access the resource on any browser, but this is not essential.
Topic: Equity & inclusion
Grade level: PK-12
Subject area: Social studies
ISTE Standards: For Educators:
Designer
  • Design authentic learning activities that align with content area standards and use digital tools and resources to maximize active, deep learning.
For Students:
Global Collaborator
  • Students use digital tools to connect with learners from a variety of backgrounds and cultures, engaging with them in ways that broaden mutual understanding and learning.
Knowledge Constructor
  • Students build knowledge by actively exploring real-world issues and problems, developing ideas and theories and pursuing answers and solutions.

Proposal summary

Purpose & objective

Participants will:
-understand the history of and partnership with Indigenous stakeholders that led to the creation of this App
-engage in dialogue about the importance of treaty and land acknowledgement as part of the process of Truth and Reconciliation with First Nations, Metis and Inuit communities
-explore the app as an educational tool to create dialogue around reconciliation
-deconstruct video land acknowledgements to understand criteria and key features that educators might use to engage student voice in the creation of land acknowledgements for their local context

Outline

Explore the free Whose Land app that uses GIS technology to identify 650+ Indigenous Nations, territories, and Indigenous communities across Canada, United States and Australia. Included videos and learning materials foster better understanding about why land acknowledgements are important, and how Indigenous people view their relationship to the land.

Supporting research

Battiste, M. (2002). Indigenous Knowledge and Pedagogy in First Nations Education – A Literature Review With Recommendations. National Working Group on Education and the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC). (http://www.afn.ca/uploads/files/education/24._2002_oct_marie_battiste_indigenousknowledgeandpedagogy_lit_review_for_min_working_group.pdf)

Cifuentes, L., & Murphy, K. L. (2000). Promoting multicultural understanding and positive self-concept through a distance learning community: cultural connections. Educational Technology Research and Development, 48(1), 69-83. (http://www.springerlink.com/content/l7u465201uh04725/)

Haight, M., Quan-Haase, A., & Corbett, B. A. (2014). Revisiting the digital divide in Canada: the impact of demographic factors on access to the internet, level of online activity, and social networking site usage. Information, Communication, and Society, 17 (4). 503 - 519. Web. 30 Sep, 2015 ( http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1369118X.2014.891633 )

“High School Graduation Rates Much Lower In Northern Canada Than In The South.” The Conference Board of Canada. n.p. n.d. Web. 30 Sep, 2015 (http://www.conferenceboard.ca/press/newsrelease/10-08-26/high_school_graduation_rates_much_lower_in_northern_canada_than_in_the_south.aspx )

Lewthwaite, B. & McMillan, B. (2010). She Can Bother Me, and That’s Because She Cares: What Inuit Students Say About Teaching and Their Learning. Canadian Journal of Education, 33 (1), 140-175. (http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ883527.pdf)

Motskin, A. & Gallinger, Z. (2015). The Vast Disparity in Canada’s High School Graduation Rates. The 10 and 3. Web. 30 Sep, 2015 (http://www.the10and3.com/the-vast-disparity-in-canadas-high-school-graduation-rates-00016/)

Sweeney, M. (2007). The use of videoconferencing techniques which support constructivism in K–12 education. Ed.D. dissertation, University of Massachusetts Lowell, United States — Massachusetts: (http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?index=0&did=1331418151&SrchMode=1&sid=3&Fmt=2&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1199370880&cfc=1)

Ward Melville Heritage Organization. (2002). Videoconferencing exposes students to new worlds. T.H.E. (Technological Horizons in Education) Journal, 29(8). (http://thejournal.com/articles/2002/03/01/videoconferencing-exposes-students-to-new-worlds.aspx)

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Presenters

Photo
Michael Furdyk, TakingITGlobal

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