Creative Constructor
Lab Virtual
Leadership Exchange
at ISTELive 21
Edtech Advocacy &
Policy Summit

5 Things Edtech Leaders Need to Know About AT!

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Listen and learn : Lecture

Janet Peters  
Maggie Pickett  

For students with disabilities to be able to succeed in school, their assistive technology must seamlessly integrate with the educational technology ecosystem. Learn the five key things edtech leaders need to know about assistive technology to create a technology vision of enhanced learning for all students.

Audience: Curriculum/district specialists, Technology coordinators/facilitators
Skill level: Beginner
Attendee devices: Devices not needed
Topic: Equity & inclusion
Grade level: PK-12
ISTE Standards: For Education Leaders:
Empowering Leader
  • Support educators in using technology to advance learning that meets the diverse learning, cultural, and social-emotional needs of individual students.
Visionary Planner
  • Engage education stakeholders in developing and adopting a shared vision for using technology to improve student success, informed by the learning sciences.
Equity and Citizenship Advocate
  • Ensure all students have access to the technology and connectivity necessary to participate in authentic and engaging learning opportunities.
Disclosure: The submitter of this session has been supported by a company whose product is being included in the session
Influencer Disclosure: This session includes a presenter that indicated a “material connection” to a brand that includes a personal, family or employment relationship, or a financial relationship. See individual speaker menu for disclosure information.

Proposal summary

Purpose & objective

The purpose The Endrew F. decision, with its requirement that public schools use IEPs to provide meaningful educational benefits to SWD, has only increased the importance of using accessible educational materials (AEM), assistive technology (AT) and educational technology (EdTech). Most SWDs have access to public education, with 63% of students served under IDEA spending 80% or more of their time in general education classrooms (NCES, 2018), and more SWD get timely access to AEM than they did ten years ago. Growing evidence also supports the use of AT and EdTech to enhance teaching and learning for all students, particularly those with disabilities (OET, 2016). Far too often, however, educators, especially those with a background in general education teaching in inclusive classrooms, are unfamiliar with how best to implement AT supports, and many LEAs have particularly struggled with meeting this important standard during the transition to emergency remote teaching demanded by COVID-19 (Cummings, 2020). This session will provide education leaders with detailed information about free federally-funded resources that can help them apply evidence-based practices towards the effective implementation and integration of AT, EdTech, and AEM.

Evidence of Success: Research indicates that the selection of appropriate technology accommodations and supports for SWDs continues to be made in the absence of reliable information (Bausch, Ault, & Hasselbring, 2015). An increased national focus on UDL and accessible digital content and delivery systems has the potential to dramatically improve outcomes for students with disabilities (Educause, 2018; OET, 2016). Tech-savvy teachers have more opportunities to present materials in multiple formats to enhance instruction and increase meaningful access to and progress in the general education curriculum for SWDs. To ensure that SWDs benefit from the availability of AT and EdTech, they must also have tools that closely align to their needs and have access to these tools in every setting where they experience barriers (Albus, et al, 2018)

PARTICIPANT OUTCOMES:
1. Participants will have increased understanding of practices and procedures that can be used to ensure access to education for SWD in blended, online, and emergency remote learning contexts.
2. Participants will have increased awareness of free resources and technical assistance available to districts, teachers, and parents in order to support diverse learners' success with digital learning and digital materials.


REFERENCES:
Albus, D., Thurlow, M. L., Liu, K. K., Lazarus, S. S., & Larson, E. D. (2018). Educators' perspectives on classroom implementation of accessibility features and accommodations. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Data Informed Accessibility-Making Optimal Needs-based Decisions (DIAMOND).

Bausch, M. E., Ault, M. J. & Hasselbring, T. (2015). Assistive Technology In Schools: Lessons Learned From The National Assistive Technology Research Institute. In Edyburn, D. (Ed.) Efficacy of Assistive Technology Interventions: 1 (Advances in Special Education Technology). London: Emerald Group Publishing.

Cummings, J. (2020). Department of Education OCR Guidance for K-12 Provides Clues on Web Accessibility Compliance for Higher Ed. Educause.

Educause (2018). 2018 Key Issues in Teaching and Learning.

U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) (2018). The Condition of Education 2018: Children and Youth with Disabilities. Author: Washington, DC.

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology (OET) (2016). Future ready learning: Reimagining the role of technology in education. 2016 National Education Technology Plan.

Outline

I. Introduction to the Center on Inclusive Technology & Education Systems (CITES)
II. What is an Inclusive Technology Ecosystem?
a.) Interactive Word Wall Activity to engage the audience on common educational technologies and potential barriers to students who use AT
III. 5 Things EdTech Leaders Need to Know about AT
a.) What it looks like "in practice" either via video or case story
b.) “Turn and Talk” offered for participants to turn to each other about the "Thing" and talk it through for a very brief period before whole group lecture resumes
IV. Questions and Conclusion

Supporting research

Albus, D., Thurlow, M. L., Liu, K. K., Lazarus, S. S., & Larson, E. D. (2018). Educators' perspectives on classroom implementation of accessibility features and accommodations. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Data Informed Accessibility-Making Optimal Needs-based Decisions (DIAMOND).

Bausch, M. E., Ault, M. J. & Hasselbring, T. (2015). Assistive Technology In Schools: Lessons Learned From The National Assistive Technology Research Institute. In Edyburn, D. (Ed.) Efficacy of Assistive Technology Interventions: 1 (Advances in Special Education Technology). London: Emerald Group Publishing.

Cummings, J. (2020). Department of Education OCR Guidance for K-12 Provides Clues on Web Accessibility Compliance for Higher Ed. Educause.

Educause (2018). 2018 Key Issues in Teaching and Learning.

U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) (2018). The Condition of Education 2018: Children and Youth with Disabilities. Author: Washington, DC.

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology (OET) (2016). Future ready learning: Reimagining the role of technology in education. 2016 National Education Technology Plan.

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Presenters

Photo
Janet Peters, CAST

Janet Peters is the Project Director for the Center on Inclusive Technology & Education Systems (CITES) at CAST. In her role, Janet works with the CITES team to help build the capacity of school districts to improve their collaboration and efficacy of Assistive Technology (AT) and Educational Technology (EdTech) systems. Janet has been working with technology for people with disabilities in many capacities since 1994. She is the former director of PACER Center’s Simon Technology Center and most recently the Project Coordinator of Accessible Technology with the Great Lakes ADA Center, a member of the ADA National Network.

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